osha inspector

Get Compliant Before a Surprise OSHA Inspection – Avoiding a Rooftop Fall Protection Fine

If you’ve ever been shocked when an OSHA inspector arrives unannounced to inspect your rooftop fall protection methods, you’re not alone. These random checks surprise many companies. Safety officers fear the inspector will discover issues that violate OSHA's stringent requirements. Managers wonder if the investigator will shut down their operations for job-related hazards. Chief executive officers worry their companies will pay a fine if their roofs fail inspection. It’s no fun for anyone.

tools

Choose the Right Roof Fall Protection Tool for the Job

Safety needs to be the number one priority of every supervisor and employee involved in a rooftop project. While it's not always possible to eliminate every potential hazard, it is crucial that they are identified and that the proper roof fall protection tools are put in place. So what’s the right tool for the job? We break down the six most critical areas you need to keep an eye on, and how to address each hazard.

Difference Between OSHA 1910 and OSHA 1926

OSHA’s Roof Fall Protection Rules: Know the Difference Between OSHA 1910 General Industry & OSHA 1926 Construction Standards

OSHA safety standards, especially for roof fall protection, can be a source of confusion for many industrial companies. Two OSHA standards can apply – 29 CFR 1910, which governs “general industry” safety standards and 29 CFR 1926, which governs construction sites specifically. The OSHA general industry standards exclude construction (as well as agriculture and marine industries, which also have their own standards), but both standards can sometimes apply to the same worksite at different times. Determining which one you should adhere to can be a challenge.