5 Reasons To Rethink Building Your Own Guardrail System

If your building has rooftop access or elevated walkways, you might have a fall risk or two on your hands. To stay compliant with OSHA, not to mention keep your employees and visitors safe, you’re going to need a guardrail system. But let’s say you don’t access these areas very often. Or perhaps your workers are extremely sure-footed. Or maybe you’ve got some pretty serious chops when it comes to DIY projects. It might be tempting to just go ahead and build your own guardrails. Right?

Wrong. Unless you are fully trained on the specific requirements for guardrails, it can be a much more elaborate endeavor than you anticipated.  Nonetheless, if you’re still thinking about building your own, here are a few things you’ll want to keep in mind before you add yet another job to your to-do list.

Avoid These 6 Common Mistakes When Utilizing Rooftop Guardrails

Avoid These 6 Common Mistakes when Utilizing Rooftop Guardrails

To keep your workers safe—and comply with OSHA's fall protection guidelines—you must provide rooftop guardrails for crews working at elevations of six feet or more. Recognizing the necessity for fall protection systems is the first step towards workplace safety, but OSHA compliance requires extra diligence, in-depth knowledge, and preventative troubleshooting.

From years of experience with OSHA's regulations, we know that certain aspects of safety rails can present unforeseen challenges for safety managers. To help, we've compiled a list of the six most common mistakes we have seen. Additionally, we provide some actionable solutions to these common mistakes—and hope to help provide better protection for you, your workers, and your equipment.