Safety News: September 2019

Safety in the News: August 2019

Below is a quick selection of some notable safety-related news headlines for the month of AUGUST 2019:


New Brochure Spotlights OSHA On-Site Consultation Program (Safety+Health)
According to OSHA, an onsite consultation offers small employers confidential workplace safety and health services, assistance with finding and fixing hazards, advice on complying with OSHA standards, and help with establishing and improving safety and health programs and training workers.

Guard Rails & Lifelines: Providing the Right Fall Protection System for Your Roof

If you’re a safety manager, keeping your employees healthy and safe is a top priority. To serve that purpose (and to avoid hefty fines), staying compliant with the OSHA regulations on fall protection should be a top priority, especially on commercial rooftops. Fortunately, there are several OSHA-approved solutions available that make staying compliant simple. Since each situation is different, your fall protection system needs to match your individual requirements. Let’s take a look at the two main ways to keep your team out of harm’s way and how you can choose the right system for the job.

RETA National Conference 2019 RETA TradeshowRETA National Conference

BlueWater to Exhibit at RETA 2019 National Conference

CHASKA, MN – (August 23, 2019) – BlueWater, makers of industry-leading rooftop safety solutions, will exhibit at RETA 2019 National Conference in Las Vegas, NV, as part of Safety Products Group.  Dates for this year’s show, held at the RIO All Suites Hotel & Casino, will be October 8-11, 2019.

At the booth (#513), attendees can meet with safety experts from BlueWater (and its sister company Fabenco) and see the latest innovations in passive and active OSHA-compliant fall protection solutions for the food and beverage manufacturing industry.

Training Seasonal Summer Workers on the Importance of Roof Fall Protection

Roof fall protection is important all year long. But when construction crews and facility managers often have bigger workloads during the warm summer months they hire seasonal workers to help them manage the increased demand. These workers are invaluable to the company and the project, but they may not be as experienced as your full-time employees—and they may not be as familiar with your company's fall safety precautions and the industry's regulations.

It's essential to bring your seasonal workers up to speed on OSHA regulations, and how to stay safe while working at height on a construction site or while doing maintenance work on an existing facility. Here's how to train these seasonal employees so your entire crew can enjoy a safe work environment.

4 Key Types of Fall Protection Systems for the Food and Beverage Industry

The food and beverage industry is a massive market, both in the United States and across the globe. Food processing and packaging facilities, representing a large sector of this industry, struggle daily with protecting workers from safety hazards. And one huge concern safety managers in this industry deal with is providing adequate fall protection systems on our facilities’ rooftops when work and maintenance requires employees to go up on them. Installing a guard rail or life line system ensures that you and your workers stay safe at all times. Yet not all fall protection systems work in the same way, meaning that different roofs require different systems for maximum safety.

The variety of different options can be confusing to navigate — even for seasoned safety professionals. If you would like to increase your knowledge about the best type of protection system for your facility’s roof, keep reading. This article outlines four of the most common protection systems currently on the market, as well as the particular applications of each one.

5 Reasons To Rethink Building Your Own Guardrail System

If your building has rooftop access or elevated walkways, you might have a fall risk or two on your hands. To stay compliant with OSHA, not to mention keep your employees and visitors safe, you’re going to need a guardrail system. But let’s say you don’t access these areas very often. Or perhaps your workers are extremely sure-footed. Or maybe you’ve got some pretty serious chops when it comes to DIY projects. It might be tempting to just go ahead and build your own guardrails. Right?

Wrong. Unless you are fully trained on the specific requirements for guardrails, it can be a much more elaborate endeavor than you anticipated.  Nonetheless, if you’re still thinking about building your own, here are a few things you’ll want to keep in mind before you add yet another job to your to-do list.

Safety in the News: June 2019

Below is a quick selection of some notable safety-related news headlines for the month of JUNE 2019:


OSHA Administers Warning About Working in Heat (Construction & Demolition Recycling)
As temperatures rise, OSHA is reminding employers to protect their employees from the dangers of working in hot weather. OSHA’s message is simple: Water. Rest. Shade. The agency says employers should encourage workers to drink water every 15 minutes and take frequent rest breaks in shaded areas.

Rooftop Worker Hanging Over a Leading Edge OSHA

What are Leading Edges? Protect Them with Guard Railings

Leading Edges: a regulatory term for a very real risk that every construction manager, laborer, or facilities maintenance worker understands too well. As a reminder, a leading edge is an unprotected edge and side of a floor, roof, or other walking/working surfaces which changes location as additional floor, roof, or formwork sections are placed. While a part of every job site (and theoretically, every building, period), they present a risk for even the most seasoned workers.

In this article, we’re exploring the different types of leading edges your team might encounter, along with other considerations, and how safety guard rails can protect them.

Avoid These 6 Common Mistakes When Utilizing Rooftop Guardrails

Avoid These 6 Common Mistakes when Utilizing Rooftop Guardrails

To keep your workers safe—and comply with OSHA's fall protection guidelines—you must provide rooftop guardrails for crews working at elevations of six feet or more. Recognizing the necessity for fall protection systems is the first step towards workplace safety, but OSHA compliance requires extra diligence, in-depth knowledge, and preventative troubleshooting.

From years of experience with OSHA's regulations, we know that certain aspects of safety rails can present unforeseen challenges for safety managers. To help, we've compiled a list of the six most common mistakes we have seen. Additionally, we provide some actionable solutions to these common mistakes—and hope to help provide better protection for you, your workers, and your equipment.