Safety News: December 2019

Safety in the News: December 2019

BELOW ARE SOME SAFETY-RELATED ARTICLES AND NEWS FROM THE MONTH OF DECEMBER 2019:


OSHA Enforcement and Compliance Increases in 2019 To Keep America’s Workforce Safe
The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) fiscal year (FY) 2019 final statistics show a significant increase in the number of inspections and a record amount of compliance assistance to further the mission of ensuring that employers provide workplaces free of hazards....

Growth of the Steel Industry: Keeping New Employees Safe with Safety Railing Systems

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the metal manufacturing workforce in America oscillates around 380,000 workers. And the steel industry, in particular, continues to attract more and more employees as it develops. It’s easy to see why: in 2018, global steel production shot up by 4.6 percent compared to the previous year. And according to Trading Economics, steel production in the United States has increased by about 300 metric tons from June to July 2019 alone!

The Ins and Outs of Roof Lifeline Systems: Which is Best for Your Job?

OSHA makes it clear that roof safety is non-negotiable: "Each employee on a walking/working surface (horizontal and vertical surface) with an unprotected side or edge which is 6 feet (1.8 m) or more above a lower level shall be protected from falling by the use of guardrail systems, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest systems." However, how you protect workers from falling can vary depending on the circumstances. Roof lifeline systems are one of your fall protection options.

regional map of US

How Regionality Affects Your Roof Fall Protection Plan

Roof fall protection is important no matter where you live, but rooftop risks vary depending upon your region and its weather conditions. How you train your employees, identify dangers, and manage those risks will vary, too.

OSHA lists numerous requirements that apply to all situations; for example: "The employer must ensure each employee on a runway or similar walkway is protected from falling 4 feet (1.2 m) or more to a lower level by a guardrail system.”

Rooftop worker utilizing a horizontal lifeline Rooftop worker utilizing a horizontal lifeline

When to Use Horizontal Lifelines

The Occupational Health & Safety Administration makes it abundantly clear—roof fall protection is non-negotiable. But even with OSHA’s strict requirements, you still have some options when it comes to fall protection systems. This is because every job site is different, and the risk of falling presents itself in different ways from site to site. For example, roof slope, holes and hatches in the roof, and where the leading edge is in relation to the work zone can present different challenges. Fortunately, with options like safety railings, horizontal lifelines, safety nets, and more, you’ve got a lot of choices when it comes to choosing the right fall protection systems for your workspace.

Architectural Series by BlueWaterArchitectural guardrail

Keep Your Campus Aesthetic and Maintain Safety with Custom Safety Railings

An attractive campus starts with beautiful buildings. Even a cursory glance at Architectural Digest’s 50 Most Beautiful Colleges in America makes it abundantly clear: campus architecture—whether classic or contemporary—plays a large part in school perception and culture. It’s no wonder universities and other institutions of higher education spend so much time and money maintaining and restoring their original buildings. Careful consideration is given to new construction and how it fits in, both with the landscape and the existing structures. Planners and designers want to create a unified appearance on campus, an admirable challenge on campuses that likely includes buildings erected over the course of several decades or centuries! Because of this, safety railings and rooftop fall protections might be the furthest thing from their minds.

Safety News: September 2019

Safety in the News: September 2019

Below is a quick selection of some notable safety-related news headlines for the month of SEPTEMBER 2019:


Acting OSHA Construction Safety Head Made Official
Scott Ketcham is officially the top administrator of the safety agency’s Directorate of Construction after serving for several months as acting head of the office, the Department of Labor announced Sept. 16. Ketcham succeeds Director Dean McKenzie, who died in November 2018.

Beyond Fall Protection Equipment: Making Safety Work in the Real World

When companies follow OSHA regulations for roof fall protection, they’re doing more than avoiding fines. They are making the workplace a safer place for all, whether employee, contract worker, or visitor. It’s nice to think that implementing fall protection equipment like a guardrail is enough—but it doesn’t always work out that way. From inclement weather to unexpected visitors, the world is full of variables and unforeseen situations. To keep your workers and visitors safe at all times, roof safety strategies need to include both equipment and workplace culture. To put together a complete roof fall protection strategy, here are few things to consider: