Rooftop Worker Hanging Over a Leading Edge OSHA

What are Leading Edges? Protect Them with Guard Railings

Leading Edges: a regulatory term for a very real risk that every construction manager, laborer, or facilities maintenance worker understands too well. As a reminder, a leading edge is an unprotected edge and side of a floor, roof, or other walking/working surfaces which changes location as additional floor, roof, or formwork sections are placed. While a part of every job site (and theoretically, every building, period), they present a risk for even the most seasoned workers.

In this article, we’re exploring the different types of leading edges your team might encounter, along with other considerations, and how safety guard rails can protect them.

Avoid These 6 Common Mistakes When Utilizing Rooftop Guardrails

Avoid These 6 Common Mistakes when Utilizing Rooftop Guardrails

To keep your workers safe—and comply with OSHA's fall protection guidelines—you must provide rooftop guardrails for crews working at elevations of six feet or more. Recognizing the necessity for fall protection systems is the first step towards workplace safety, but OSHA compliance requires extra diligence, in-depth knowledge, and preventative troubleshooting.

From years of experience with OSHA's regulations, we know that certain aspects of safety rails can present unforeseen challenges for safety managers. To help, we've compiled a list of the six most common mistakes we have seen. Additionally, we provide some actionable solutions to these common mistakes—and hope to help provide better protection for you, your workers, and your equipment.

7 ways to maintain ladder safety LadderGuard ladder security door

7 Ways to Maintain Ladder Safety and Security in Your Industrial Facility

Ladder safety continues to be one key element in keeping your facility running smoothly and without incident. Government safety regulations clearly dictate the basic rules you must follow when it comes to placing and using ladders, and you'll want to follow these regulations at a bare minimum. In addition, as with any possible access to restricted areas, ladders can represent security concerns if left unattended and unguarded. Today, we will look at a few ways to secure the ladders in your workplace, in order to keep your workers and equipment safe.

Workers discussing roof fall protection Workers discussing roof fall protection

Key Differences Between US & Canadian Roof Fall Protection Regulations

Providing roof fall protection is key for any business. If you have a business with manufacturing sites in both the United States and Canada, then you're already aware that there’s both similarities and differences in safety regulations of the two countries. When it comes to safety, there are many basics which are simply a given, such as ensuring the safety of workers and guests to the sites. However, since regulations can be tricky to navigate, keeping the differences top-of-mind is a best practice for success in order to stay compliant in each location. Today, we'll focus on a few of the differences you should be aware of.

Stay OSHA Compliant During Winter Roof Maintenance with Safety Guard Rails

Stay OSHA Compliant During Winter Roof Maintenance with Safety Guard Rails

When winter arrives, it's easy to think that having a roof fall protection system — like safety guard rails — isn’t a top priority. After all, outdoor work slows significantly in the colder months. The truth is, there’s plenty of reasons your workers may need to get out on the roof this winter, and you’ll want to play safe — no matter what the weather may bring.

Safety manager surveying fall protection systems for roofs

Where to Start When It Comes to Fall Protection Systems for Roofs: Your 5-Step Guide

Establishing an effective system for your roof is not always an easy process, especially if you lack experience or familiarity with OSHA regulations. Fortunately, you can streamline your fall protection efforts by following some simple steps. Below is your five-step guide to establishing fall protection systems for roofs.

Why Safety Railings Are A Must, Even If You Rarely Access Your Commercial Rooftop

If you’re a commercial facility owner, roof fall protection might be the last thing on your mind. The idea of installing safety railings and guardrail systems can seem less of a priority to more demanding business objectives and, understandably, it can fall to the wayside. After all, if no one is up there regularly, shouldn’t you focus on more pressing concerns?

Unfortunately, this oversight can come back to haunt you. The truth is, you’ll likely have someone accessing your roof several times a year. Today we’re going to look at some situations that require rooftop access, and why roof fall protection is mission critical – for you, for your employees, and for your business.

Inspection OSHA Statistics Total OSHA Inspection StatisticsTotal OSHA Inspection StatsTotal OSHA Inspection StatisticsOSHA Total Inspection Statistics

Total OSHA Inspection Statistics

Budget reductions and changes in policy have contributed to an overall decrease in OSHA inspections in recent years. But even with fewer inspections, safety concerns are always a top priority for employers. Remember that less frequent visits from OSHA inspectors do not mean lower risk of accidents or decreased responsibility for safety and accident prevention in your workplace. To protect your workers and your business, always fully adhere to OSHA standards, and ensure proper installation and use of the safety equipment and rooftop fall protection systems. Participation in a qualified voluntary compliance program may also help you be exempt from future programmed visits.

osha inspector

Get Compliant Before a Surprise OSHA Inspection – Avoiding a Rooftop Fall Protection Fine

If you’ve ever been shocked when an OSHA inspector arrives unannounced to inspect your rooftop fall protection methods, you’re not alone. These random checks surprise many companies. Safety officers fear the inspector will discover issues that violate OSHA's stringent requirements. Managers wonder if the investigator will shut down their operations for job-related hazards. Chief executive officers worry their companies will pay a fine if their roofs fail inspection. It’s no fun for anyone.

Safety Inspector Reviewing OSHA Guardrail Regulations

Cal-OSHA vs. Federal OSHA Guardrail Regulations: Know and Understand the Differences

The Cal-OSHA code, written to protect workers in the state of California, is notoriously more stringent than federal OSHA regulations for guardrail protection and roof fall protection systems. If you've been managing or paying attention to workplace safety issues, you likely know that California regulators have set higher standards, but you may not know where they exceed the federal OSHA guardrail code. Even if you're not located in the Golden State, it can be beneficial to understand the additional safety measures that a product adhering to both Cal-OSHA and federal OSHA guardrail regulations can carry.